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School of Politics, Philosophy, and Public Affairs Meet Our Faculty!

Joseph Campbell2 1Joe Campbell

Professor

Office: Johnson Tower 821
Phone: 335-9106
E-mail: josephc@wsu.edu
Bio
Joe Campbell is a professor of Philosophy in the School of Politics, Philosophy, and Public Affairs. His primary areas of interest include free will, moral responsibility, David Hume, and skepticism. He was recently awarded a WSU Humanities Fellowship for a project on punishment and prison reform. Dr. Campbell is currently editing his 9th book: The Blackwell Companion to Free Will. Many of his co-edited volumes are included in the Topics in Contemporary Philosophy series, published by MIT Press.

Education
• Ph.D. Philosophy, University of Arizona, 1992
• M.A. Philosophy, University of Arizona, 1988
• B.A. Philosophy, Rutgers University, 1983

Teaching
• Elementary Logic (PHIL 201)
• Philosophy in Film (PHIL 210)
• Science & Religion (PHIL 413)
• Metaphysics (PHIL 446)
• Theory of Knowledge (PHIL 447)

Awards
• Humanities Fellowship, WSU, 2016-17
• Honors Thesis Advisor Award, Honors College, WSU, 2006
• Marian E. Smith Faculty Achievement Award, WSU, 2005

Selected Publications
• “P. F. Strawson’s Free Will Naturalism,” International Journal for the Study of Skepticism 7 (2017): 26-52. Read Article
• “The Consequence Argument,” The Routledge Companion to Free Will, M. Griffith, N. Levy, and K. Timpe (eds.) (Routledge, 2017). Read Article
• “Two Problems for Classical Incompatibilism,” Free Will and Moral Responsibility, I. Haji and J. Couette (eds.) (Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2013). Read Article
• “Free Will and the Necessity of the Past,” Analysis 67 (2007): 105–111 Read Article
• “Farewell to Direct Source Incompatibilism,” Acta Analytica 21 (2006): 36–49. Read Article
• “Descartes on Spontaneity, Indifference, and Alternatives,” New Essays on the Rationalists, R.J. Gennaro and C. Huenemann (eds.) (Oxford University Press, 1999). Read Article
• “A Compatibilist Theory of Alternative Possibilities,” Philosophical Studies 88: 319–330 (December 1997). Read Article